Sunday, November 17, 2019

Zee German & their hedges

By Markus Bickel

For seven long years, there was nothing I feared more than the annual inspections carried out by members of the Schöneberg-Friedenau Association of Allotment Gardeners. As far as I’m concerned, these inspectors are nothing more than a terror squad masquerading …

The night my scoop evaporated. Deputy Ambassador James D. Bindenagel recounts the night the Wall came down when he was a diplomat in East Berlin

By James D. Bindenagel

On that fateful night of November 9, 1989, there was no sign of revolution in the air. Sure, change was coming – but slowly, we thought. As the US Deputy Ambassador to East Germany at the time, I lived on …

Germany is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Peaceful Revolution against communist rule

Germany is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Peaceful Revolution against communist rule
By Ilko-Sascha Kowalczuk

In the fall and winter of 1989– 90, the entire world watched in anticipation as events unfolded in Germany. It seemed that every day brought something that would have been considered impossible only a day earlier. The highpoint was the …

How Brandenburg’s farmers are striving to fulfill their Berlin customers’ demands for organic fruits and vegetables

By Manfred Ronzheimer

Farmer Sven Geelhaar has set up five rolling chicken coops, each with 220 hens, in the countryside around Chorin in Brandenburg. “On the upper floor, they’ve got nesting areas, perches for sleeping as well as food and water,” says Geelhaar, …

Street-smart jump-start: The strategic partnership between Ford and VW is good for both carmakers.

By Carsten Germis

Almost four years have passed since the fall of 2015, and that moment when US environmental protection officials exposed the extent to which the Volkswagen Group had manipulated exhaust emissions in its cars, thereby throwing VW into the largest crisis …

Borussia Dortmund is eager to break the supremacy of FC Bayern Munich in Germany’s Bundesliga

By Thomas Kistner

The best news from the Bundesliga, Germany’s top-tier soccer league, is that it looks like there will finally be a real battle for the championship this season. Yet only two teams have greater than an outside chance to vie for …

Petromelancholia and its discontents

By Benjamin Steininger

Fossil fuels have driven prosperity, technology and politics but have also created dependencies as well as new possibilities for waging war and destruction

 

In 1944, one year before the end of World War II, the Russian- Ukrainian biogeochemist Vladimir …

Arab clans control many Berlin streets where the police dare to patrol only in squads of multiple officers.

By Andreas Kopietz

An August evening on Sonnenallee, Berlin-Neukölln: Tires screech as police vans come to a sudden stop. Officers enter hookah bars and cafes. Men sitting at tables look surprised. The officers are accompanied by tax investigators and employees of the public …

Tired of winning: Who bears the consequences of President Trump’s tariff policies?

By Nikolaus Piper

In early August, President Donald Trump was able to celebrate a small yet tangible success in his beloved trade war. The European Union and the United States had just signed an agreement on the import of American beef to Europe …

Trash tourism: A popular new activity for Berlin visitors: picking up garbage with friends

Trash tourism: A popular new activity for Berlin visitors: picking up garbage with friends
By Peter Zehner

Germans used to be undisputed leaders in the global export of goods, and they’ve been world champions several times in soccer. In each case, whenever they noticed that their own skills weren’t going to be enough, they simply procured foreign …

Before passing away, Ferdinand Piëch exhorted his heirs to keep the Porsche-Volkswagen Group intact

By Ulrich Viehöver

Many in the business feared him. Some even hated him. Managers tended to avoid him. Thousands of car aficionados revered him. And almost all his competitors copied him. Germany’s highest-profile car designer and business leader Ferdinand K. Piech is dead. …

Bill Gates is wrong. Nuclear power will not save the climate. Beyond Chernobyl and Fukushima, there’s too much speaking against it

Bill Gates is wrong. Nuclear power will not save the climate. Beyond Chernobyl and Fukushima, there’s too much speaking against it
By Christoph von Eichhorn

Nuclear power? No, thank you! “That chapter is over,” a spokesperson recently proclaimed. Nuclear power isn’t even a topic anymore, she argued. And this spokesperson wasn’t from some environmental organization or the like; she was representing RWE, one of three …

Front runner: Biking the Iron Curtain from the Arctic to the Black Sea

By Tim Moore

For an Englishman the wrong side of 50, it was an adventure that seemed to tick a lot of boxes. The European Cycling Federation had just declared its latest long-distance Euro Velo route open: EV13, tracing the 9,000-km path of …

BACK ON CENTER STAGE

By Michael Müller

Berlin was an eminent spot in the world of academia in the Roaring Twenties and is again becoming the place to be for young talent and top-notch scientists. One in three newly enrolled students at our universities and colleges comes …

The Solidarity Pact that provided cash and financial stability to the eastern German states following reunification is about to expire

The Solidarity Pact that provided cash and financial stability to the eastern German states following reunification is about to expire
By Stefan Locke

It was mid-August, just before regional elections in Brandenburg and Saxony, when German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier called for a “new solidarity pact.” What the president was demanding was not more money, but a “solidarity pact of appreciation,” especially for achievements …